Category Archives: How things are made!

ISO Files and How To Provide Us Your Video Master

We recently posted about how to provide us with your audio master for duplication and replication projects. We work with many different bands and musicians to provide high-quality CD duplication and replication, for which we prefer a master in the form of a DDP file or a physical audio CD.

Eyedea Worx and Notion Worx also handles many different film projects, from features and documentaries to corporate training videos and instructional DVDs. For video projects, our requirements for a client-provided master are much the same as with audio; we prefer an .ISO file or a physical DVD master copy.

Much like with a DDP, an ISO file is a single file that’s an exact representation of an entire video file. The contents of a disc can be precisely duplicated in a single ISO file, which means that we can then duplicate the exact contents of the video project without needing any additional instructions.

iso

An ISO file is the only file that essentially acts like a physical DVD, with all of the data intact. This is why we like to either receive an ISO or a physical DVD, as both are great for re-creating an exact video sequence. ISO files can be sent via a program like Wetransfer or Dropbox and can reach us from anywhere in the world, saving shipping time and cost.

If you have separate video files (like MP4, Apple Pro-Res, or any other video format), we here at Eyedea Worx can most likely edit the clips together and author a new DVD master, but this will require some additional time and cost. Cost for video editing and authoring will depend on the length of the video and particular requirements for the DVD menu, as well as total time is takes to complete all requests. We also will need exact instructions for editing and sequencing and will create a test disc for approval before moving forward with any duplication or replication; this extra time is often not possible if a job needs to be turned around quickly.

So when considering Eyedea Worx for your DVD duplication and replication, keep in mind that the best master you can provide to ensure accurate reproduction is either a physical DVD or a ISO file. 

DDP and How to Provide Us With Your Master

cd

Eyedea Worx creates many CD projects for bands and musicians who have a new release to share with their fans.

Before we can replicate a musical project, however, we need to have a master that we can accurately re-produce while ensuring that the track order and audio quality remains intact.

There are several ways to provide us with a master, but our preference is to receive a DDP (Disc Description Protocol) or a physical replication-ready CD.  A DDP  file is basically a digital version of a completed CD, with all of the relevant information already attached to the files, including:

  1. -Files labeled DDPID, DDPMS, and DDPPQ (or SUBCODES) that all describe and organize the disc
  2. -A file that contains the audio data for the disc
  3. -A file that contains the CD Text information for the disc

A DPP is typically provided by an audio engineer or a mastering house and is the simplest, easiest, and most accurate way for Eyedea Worx to receive your master. DDP facilitates direct upload for duplication or replication and is a flawless delivery method to ensure that your copies will be exactly in the order that you intended.

ddpp

If you don’t have a DDP or a physical CD master, we can accept .WAV files. We prefer to receive these files through Wetransfer, a free service that allows users to send larger files.

Once received, we must burn a physical copy of those individual .WAV files in order to create the master copy for replication or duplication.

In order for us to take individual .WAV files and create a CD that matches what you envision for the final product, however, we will need you to send us some instructions before we create the master copy:

  1. -In what order do the tracks need to be sequenced? Even if the .WAV files are numbered in the file name, having a track list will ensure that we can get the order correct.
  2. -Do you want any gaps between songs? Typically there is a 2 second pause between each track on a standard CD, but we can create the master with either a 1 second gap or no gaps if necessary.
  3. -Do you want the project’s information text embedded  on the CD? This means that the master and all copies created will have the artist name, album name, and all track titles embedded onto it so that it automatically displays the information when played in a car stereo or in a computer player like Itunes or Windows Media Player.

Creating a physical master from .WAV files does require some time on our end, so there is a $25 fee to create a master from .WAV files. Embedding the text information also requires additional time, so there is an additional $25 fee to create a text-embedded master. Once the physical master is created, we will send you a test disk (there will be a shipping charge if you’re not in Denver) so you can double-check that the master is exactly how you intended before we make any copies.

So while we can receive .WAV files to create a master for replication, it is overall quicker and easier to send us a physical master CD or DDP that you’ve already reviewed to make sure that it is exactly the final product you want to create!

Quick Turn CD Duplication With Eyedea Worx

Eyedea Worx and Notion Worx are here to help our clients to create their high quality custom projects in the easiest and most affordable way possible.

One of the more common requests we get from Colorado musicians and bands across the world is for a quick turnaround time for CD projects; often times a release party comes up quicker then expected and bands just need something to promote their new release. Typically, a CD order of 100 or more pieces takes 5-10 business days, depending on exactly what kind of CD package is requested.

However, there is one kind of CD or DVD package that can be produced in as little as 3 business days: a slimline jewel case.

The slimline jewel case

With a plastic body similar to a full-size jewel case but with half the weight and size, a silmline still showcases all of the artwork for a new release and makes a great package for a new release. The quick turnaround time is possible because the printing can be done as an insert instead of a completely new package, making it simple and quick to create the complete item without sacrificing any quality.

Slimline jewel cases can be printed with either a 2-panel insert (front and back) or 4-panel (front, back, with two pages of full color print in the middle), so the package can still be customized to fit the particular project’s needs. Full-color disc face printing in full color (600 DPI) and disc duplication or replication is included; shrink wrap is also included if desired.

Pricing for a quick turn around CD project

Give us a call today at Eyedea Worx if you need a quick turn CD duplication project completed for your upcoming CD release show!

800-973-9383 x106

info@eyedeaworx.com

 

Eco-Friendly Merchandise!

Since it’s Earth Day this week, we here at Eyedea Worx and Notion Worx wanted to let you know that we carry a wide range of products that are eco-friendly.

As great as it is to get a new CD package with shrink wrap on it, it’s understandable that many artists and businesses want to go with something that will leave the smallest carbon footprint possible- it’s very easy for all that plastic to pile up!

That’s why one of the many things we provide to our clients is branded merchandise that is made from 100% recycled material.

Here just a few of the options we have at Eyedea Worx for eco-friendly merchandise:

CDs from 100% Recycled Materials

 

eco friendly cds

 

Made from 100% recycled materials, we offer many of the same options for regular CD and DVD packages in this more Eco-friendly option. We do not shrink wrap these and the packages themselves are a much greener option.

 Download Cards Made from Seeds

 

ecodropcard

Download cards are a great way for musicians to either give out their music to fans or sell it as an alternative to CDs. These special Eco-friendly download cards are made from wildflower seeds, not the standard plastic.

Cotton Drawstring Backpack with Rope Strings

 

backpack_ecofriendly

Backpacks are an excellent walking advertisement for your brand and very useful. Unlike most standard packs in this style, the straps are made of rope instead of plastic and the body is still a comfortable 100% cotton material, making it great for hiking or any other outdoor activity!

all eco friendly

These are just a few of the many Eco-friendly products that we have available for our clients at Eyedea Worx, and you can see many more of them at our website here.

The Musical Brain: Novel Study of Jazz Players Shows Common Brain Circuitry Processes Both Music and Language

 

Originally posted by Neuroscience News and original article can be found here.

 

Kenny Dorham

Kenny Dorham

 

Researchers scanned brains while musicians “traded fours”.

 

The brains of jazz musicians engrossed in spontaneous, improvisational musical conversation showed robust activation of brain areas traditionally associated with spoken language and syntax, which are used to interpret the structure of phrases and sentences. But this musical conversation shut down brain areas linked to semantics — those that process the meaning of spoken language, according to results of a study by Johns Hopkins researchers.

 

The study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to track the brain activity of jazz musicians in the act of “trading fours,” a process in which musicians participate in spontaneous back and forth instrumental exchanges, usually four bars in duration. The musicians introduce new melodies in response to each other’s musical ideas, elaborating and modifying them over the course of a performance.

 

The improvisation between the musicians activated areas of the brain linked to syntactic processing for language, called the inferior frontal gyrus and posterior superior temporal gyrus. In contrast, the musical exchange deactivated brain structures involved in semantic processing, called the angular gyrus and supramarginal gyrus. This is a picture of jazz legend, Louis Armstrong. Credit Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection.

The improvisation between the musicians activated areas of the brain linked to syntactic processing for language, called the inferior frontal gyrus and posterior superior temporal gyrus. In contrast, the musical exchange deactivated brain structures involved in semantic processing, called the angular gyrus and supramarginal gyrus. This is a picture of jazz legend, Louis Armstrong. Credit Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection.

 

The results of the study suggest that the brain regions that process syntax aren’t limited to spoken language, according to Charles Limb, M.D., an associate professor in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Rather, he says, the brain uses the syntactic areas to process communication in general, whether through language or through music.

 

Limb, who is himself a musician and holds a faculty appointment at the Peabody Conservatory, says the work sheds important new light on the complex relationship between music and language.

 

“Until now, studies of how the brain processes auditory communication between two individuals have been done only in the context of spoken language,” says Limb, the senior author of a report on the work that appears online Feb. 19 in the journal PLOS ONE. “But looking at jazz lets us investigate the neurological basis of interactive, musical communication as it occurs outside of spoken language.

 

“We’ve shown in this study that there is a fundamental difference between how meaning is processed by the brain for music and language. Specifically, it’s syntactic and not semantic processing that is key to this type of musical communication. Meanwhile, conventional notions of semantics may not apply to musical processing by the brain.”

 

To study the response of the brain to improvisational musical conversation between musicians, the Johns Hopkins researchers recruited 11 men aged 25 to 56 who were highly proficient in jazz piano performance. During each 10-minute session of trading fours, one musician lay on his back inside the MRI machine with a plastic piano keyboard resting on his lap while his legs were elevated with a cushion. A pair of mirrors was placed so the musician could look directly up while in the MRI machine and see the placement of his fingers on the keyboard. The keyboard was specially constructed so it did not have metal parts that would be attracted to the large magnet in the fMRI.

 

The improvisation between the musicians activated areas of the brain linked to syntactic processing for language, called the inferior frontal gyrus and posterior superior temporal gyrus. In contrast, the musical exchange deactivated brain structures involved in semantic processing, called the angular gyrus and supramarginal gyrus.

 

“When two jazz musicians seem lost in thought while trading fours, they aren’t simply waiting for their turn to play,” Limb says. “Instead, they are using the syntactic areas of their brain to process what they are hearing so they can respond by playing a new series of notes that hasn’t previously been composed or practiced.”

 

Practice Makes Perfect

practice guitar

By Brooke E. Layman

Practice, practice, practice. We have all heard it before. We have repeated the old adage practice makes perfect, and we have followed our own advice. But how much practice is enough and how do we know if we are actually getting better? Calm down Nancy, you aren’t the first person to ask these questions and you won’t be the last.

No one can tell you exactly how much practice is the right amount for you. An hour a day may make you great at doing crossword puzzles, but it probably won’t make you an internationally renowned jazz pianist. Psychologists have suggested that it takes 10,000 hours or approximately 10 years to become an expert at something, focusing on deliberate practice.

It’s easy to get frustrated when you feel like you’ve been doing the same thing over and over but what you don’t realize is, the more you keep plugging away you are actually getting better. Kudos to you!

You can’t go pro unless you’re as good as you can be… and know that you can always be better. Listen to the people who know what they are doing. No one became famous straight out of the womb; you are going to have to practice.

Which musician do you idolize? Watch videos and learn how to play the way they do. Follow local bands and record them on stage. Get the idea?

If you’ve been working hard on your own and are ready to start your own band, avoid bringing on people who will make the rehearsing process less productive.

If you already have a band, get all that you can out of your rehearsal time. It’s fun to get together with your band mates but rehearsal time isn’t about catching up on your life, it’s about practicing. Take a tip from Joe Satriani and make practice time all that it can be.

Don’t just practice your instrument, practice getting into a calm and relaxed state of mind. If you can learn how to find your “happy place” you can harness this feeling when you get on stage to perform.

Know the difference between mindless practice and deliberate practice. Don’t just sit down and play for the heck of playing, play it like you mean it!

And guess what friends: playing an instrument has added benefits like increasing memory capacity and relieving stress. I don’t know why you are still reading this article, go pick up your (enter instrument of choice) and starting practicing!