The challenge with music and video production

Music can be one of the most challenging elements during the production process. Original footage is not hard to create and Photoshop or AfterEffects can assist in creating one-of-a-kind graphics, but music often times becomes a thorn in the side of smaller production facilities and can even lead to some loose standards when it comes to copyright laws. Music can be one of the most challenging elements during the production process. Original footage is not hard to create and Photoshop or AfterEffects can assist in creating one-of-a-kind graphics, but music often times becomes a thorn in the side of smaller production facilities and can even lead to some loose standards when it comes to copyright laws. Great music is often vital to smaller budget projects, usually “slideshow” videos, many of which cannot afford licensing fees on popular music and have no supporting dialogue to fill dead air. While there are a multitude of options to suit your music needs, copyrighted music, without a license, should never be one of them. While prosecution, up to this point, have been relatively sparse, a lawsuit by the RIAA or related music rights group would not only tie you up in years of litigation, but send your chances of working in the production industry near zero. In this article, I will offer some advice and resources to help low-budget and independent producers find high-end music to complement a wide array of video projects. Even on a tight budget there are ways to use copyrighted music in your production. At this point, Australia has the best set-up for smaller project producers that create media for ‘domestic use.’ This process is overseen in conjunction with the Australian recording industry and allows for music to be licensed for a reasonable fee. {http://www.apra-amcos.com.au/MusicConsumers/MakingRecordingsBusinessUse/Videographers.aspx). For those producing outside of Australia, there is a similar, albeit less developed version of this concept. There are several sites that offer use of copyrighted music for domestic use. The difference, again, is the licensing fee is a fraction of what it would cost for large scale production or corporate use. Zoom is one such site that offers low cost licenses. The word on the street is that the list of available songs at Zoom is decent, but hopefully expands quickly. It is worth checking out the site, as the information changes constantly (http://www.zoomlicense.com/). Finally, there are Creative Commons licenses. Creative Commons (http://creativecommons.org/) allows artists and authors to post original content for a variety of uses. The content creator sets the terms of use for each type of media (music, images, videos, etc). There are plenty of tracks to search and many that allow low cost or no cost use in return for a credit in the final production. These are just a few ways to find great music for your next project.

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